2013-12-13 / Front Page

AIE registration needed to avoid long lines at post gates in January

By Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater
Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office


Using the AIE security system is similar to using an ATM. Simply swipe the registered military or Department of Defense identification card through the card reader for access to Fort Gordon. 
Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Using the AIE security system is similar to using an ATM. Simply swipe the registered military or Department of Defense identification card through the card reader for access to Fort Gordon. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kelly Jo Bridgwater / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office The Automated Installation Entry security system will take effect in less than five weeks, and for members of the Fort Gordon community that means taking time today that may save several minutes of delay at the gate come mid-January when the system officially goes into operation.

“In terms of the installation [people who work on Fort Gordon], I would have to say we’re only at 80 percent,” said Tom Scott, Directorate of Emergency Services security specialist. “The dependents and retirees, I cannot give you a number. That’s an unknown factor right now.”

According to Scott, AIE is being tested at the gates during non-peak hours giving customers the chance to try out the system and to assist DES with an idea of how many people have registered. Once a car pulls up to an access control point, the guard on duty will ask the customer if they have registered for AIE. If they say yes, they’re instructed to swipe their identification card. If they say no, the guard will let them know where they can get registered.

“Fifty percent of the people who come through [the gate] – military family members and retirees – have not registered,” said Scott. “They really need to take registration seriously and get it done now. If they wait until the last minute there will be long lines at the registration station, and it will make it difficult for the activation and make it difficult for them to get registered.”

It also means longer lines at the gate and time spent waiting to gain entrance to Fort Gordon.

“The more we do now the less issues we’ll have with delay time once we activate the system next month, Jan. 15, 2014,” said Scott. “A significant amount of people have not registered, but that is mostly retirees. We are reaching out to these people and informing them that they need to get registered.”

According to Scott, registration is easy.

“All they need is their ID card and to physically go to the registration site,” he said. “It takes about three to four minutes to register. People need to understand that if they are not registered by Jan. 15, 2014, we’re going to activate the system and people who come to the gate that aren’t registered will be forced to go through the visitor’s lane and you will be in a long line.”

Signs marking AIE and visitor’s lanes will soon be installed by the Directorate of Public Works. The lane markers are similar to those you see at a bank’s drive-thru service.

“Those signs have not been put up yet, but DPW is currently working to get those signs placed,” said Scott. “There will be two different signs that include lane numbers assigned above the canopy. This will let people know which lane will be activated for AIE. We will also have marquees placed near the gate letting people know that AIE is active.”

Service members who are scheduled to attend a course at Fort Gordon in the next six months can register for AIE during inprocessing.

“All personnel on temporary duty are supposed to inprocess at the administration office,” said Scott. “Incoming people whether TDY or not are getting registered whether permanently assigned or TDY status. There may be people who do not come to the office to inprocess; we need help from organizations and units to ensure that TDY personnel and permanently assigned personnel are registered.”

Registration is required for Department of Defense ID cards and includes the Common Access Card, used by active-duty military personnel, Department of the Army civilians, members of the Reserve and National Guard, contractors and DA retired civilians; and the Teslin card, which is used by military retirees, military family members and eligible disabled veterans.

Individual information captured during the registration process includes fingerprint, known as biometric information, a photograph, and the individual’s digital signature.

Registration locations include the Military Police section in Darling Hall, building 33720, room 151; the visitor control center at Gate 1, building 75; the National Security Agency visitor control center, or via mobile registration.

Information sheets on how to register for AIE are available at the gate. You may also visit http:// bit.ly/Jb24kT to learn more about AIE.

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