2013-09-20 / Front Page

Fort Gordon offers ways to boost resilience of Soldiers, families, Army civilians

Bonnie Heater
Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office


Second Lt. Jonathan Schellin, a student in the Signal Basic Officer Leaders Course, gets some guidance from Amy Lord, a lead master resilience trainer-performance expert, with the Fort Gordon Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness, and Performance and Resilience Enhancement Program. Lord was checking to see if Schellin was in the right mental place to fire and qualify on the M16 rifle on the range at Fort Gordon. 
Photo by Bonnie Heater / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Second Lt. Jonathan Schellin, a student in the Signal Basic Officer Leaders Course, gets some guidance from Amy Lord, a lead master resilience trainer-performance expert, with the Fort Gordon Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness, and Performance and Resilience Enhancement Program. Lord was checking to see if Schellin was in the right mental place to fire and qualify on the M16 rifle on the range at Fort Gordon. Photo by Bonnie Heater / Fort Gordon Public Affairs Office Multiple deployments, family separations and just the day-to-day stresses can sometimes get people down. There is support available to help those who may be in these situations.

The Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Training Center at Fort Gordon offers Resilience and Performance Enhancement Training to all members of the Army family. The skills taught by the CSF2 Training Center are longlasting and give individuals the ability to perform at their very best under pressure, as well as the ability to bounce back from adversity.

The Fort Gordon CSF2 Training Center is one of 16 training centers in the Army. The other locations are Fort Benning,Ga.; Fort Bliss, Texas; Fort Bragg, N.C.; Fort Carson, Colo.; Fort Hood, Texas; Fort Jackson, S.C.; Fort Knox,Ky.; Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Joint Base Lewis- McChord, Wash.; Fort Campbell, Ky.; Fort Drum, N.Y.; Fort Riley, Kan.; Fort Stewart, Ga.; Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; and the National Capital region.

“At the Fort Gordon CSF2 Training Center, we have a dedicated staff to provide resilience and performance enhancement training to members of our community,” said Bob Boham, the Fort Gordon CFS2 Training Center site manager. “We have the ability to produce master resilience trainers locally, without needing outside resources to conduct training.”

Master resilience trainers are graduates of an intensive 10-day course and serve as commanders’ advisor for resilience training. These Soldiers, Army civilians and Army spouses are the only personnel authorized to conduct formal resilience training to members of the Army family.

The CSF2 Training Center also teaches specific mental and emotional skills that underlie optimal human performance when it matters most: in combat, competition, healing, or managing work and home life, Boham explained.

The mission of CFS2 is to increase the physical and psychological health, resilience and enhanced performance of Soldiers, their families and Army civilians, according to Col. Marsha Lilly, communications and plans chief for CSF2. “It is the intent of the program to ultimately have a force made up of people whose resilience and total fitness enables them to thrive in both the military and civilian sector, and to meet a wide range of challenges,” said Lilly. “CSF2 training teaches coping skills, communication skills, and other life skills that not only apply to one’s professional life, but also their personal life. The take-aways from the program will last a life-time.”

CSF2 uses both online self-development and training. One of these tools is the Global Assessment Tool, which is a survey that allows individuals to confidentially assess their strength in five dimensions: social, emotional, spiritual, family and physical. Soldiers, including Army National Guard members and reservists, are required to take the GAT annually, but they can elect to take it as frequently as once a quarter.

Family members and Department of Army civilians can also take the GAT, which has questions tailored just for them.

Soldiers and Army civilians can assess the GAT by using their Common Access Card or Army Knowledge Online login. The website is located at csf2.army.mil/takethegat. html. If a family member does not have AKO login, they can self-register with a username and password.

Once an individual completes the GAT, they are given recommendations on self-development training called Comprehensive Resilience Modules.”These are web-based, self-development modules intended to build resilience across the force and teach skills that support the five dimensions of strength,” Lilly explained.

CFS2 is a long-term, enduring initiative that broadens the assessment and training of every member of the Army family beyond the standard physical and technical abilities. “As a key component of the Ready and Resilient campaign, CSF2’s efforts with resilience and performance enhancement training are becoming part of the Army culture,” Lilly said.

Resilience and performance enhancement training is becoming integrated across the Army lifecycle, from recruitment to training, development and transition. “The end state of the Ready and Resilient campaign will be achieved when the Army’s culture has embraced resilience as part of our profession and as a key and critical component to readiness,” Lilly said. “CSF2 is central to this effort, and will be part of the Army for the foreseeable future.”

To find out more about the Fort Gordon CSF2 Training Center, contact Bob Boham at 791-1232 or visit building 29717 at 431 B Street on Fort Gordon.

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